Let us know how we can help you!
 

Invisalign Promotion 2014

September 12th, 2014
Welcome to fall Boger Dental patients:

We are excited to offer our patients a great savings on Invisalign orthodontics! If you have any interest in straightening your teeth without all the metal, please contact our office for an incredible offer.

Sure, there are other options out there for straightening your teeth, but none offers the level of comfort, convenience and confidence that you’ll find with Invisalign®. And no matter what stage you’re at in life, you’ll appreciate how our cutting-edge approach to treatment has minimal interference in how you live, but has a significant positive impact on how you look and feel about yourself.

We are offering over $700 off the cost of Invisalign!  All you need to do is contact our office for a complimentary Invisalign consultation at info@bogerdental.com 

We have plenty of patients and team members who have transformed their smiles with Invisalign and you could be next with this fantastic offer!

Sincerely,

Boger Dental

 

 

 

BPA and Dental Products

March 21st, 2014

Bisphenol A and Dental Materials

Council on Scientific Affairs Statement

CHICAGO (April 2013) — Bisphenol A (BPA) has been  present in many consumer plastic products and food packaging since the 1960s.1 Some studies have suggested that BPA may have adverse health effects, which has raised concerns about its widespread use.

The food industry uses BPA in the manufacture of hard plastic bottles and the lining that coats metal cans used to hold foods and beverages. Bisphenol A also is found in many other hard plastic products (like toys and plastic tableware). In 2012 in response to a petition from the American Chemistry Council, the FDA removed regulatory authorization for BPA as an additive in baby bottles and spill-proof cups.  The FDA stated that this action was not based on safety concerns but rather on the manufacturers’ representation that the industry no longer used BPA in those items.2  BPA is also present in the environment from the release of industrial and household wastes. To a lesser extent, dental materials used to treat and prevent caries can contribute to very low-level BPA exposure for a few hours after placement.3,4,5

BPA might be found in dental composites and sealants for two reasons: 1) it’s a by-product of other ingredients in dental composites and sealants that have degraded, and; 2) it’s a trace material left-over from the manufacture of other ingredients used in dental composites and sealants. ADA research, confirmed by direct communications from dental material manufacturers, indicates that BPA is not used as a formula ingredient in dental materials.

As a product of the degradation of the material in the oral cavity: Composite resins are formulated from a mixture of monomers that are commonly based on bisphenol A diglycidyl  ether methacrylate (bis-GMA). Some composite resins may contain other monomers, in addition to bis-GMA, that are added to modify the properties of the resin. An example is bisphenol A dimethacrylate (bis-DMA). Bis-DMA-containing materials can release very small quantities of BPA, because bis-DMA is broken down by salivary enzymes.

As a trace material: BPA is used in the production of other ingredients found in many dental composites and sealants. Bis-DMA and bis-GMA are both produced using BPA as a starting ingredient, so residual BPA, which was not chemically converted into bis-DMA or bis-GMA, is likely present in trace amounts in any dental material containing these ingredients.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) provides scientific guidance on issues that affect the health of Americans, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) provides advice and recommendations on dental product safety. A 2008 report prepared by the National Toxicology Program (NTP) of the HHS states that, “Dental sealant exposure to bisphenol A occurs primarily with use of dental sealants [containing] bisphenol A dimethacrylate. This exposure is considered an acute and infrequent event with little relevance to estimating general population exposures.”6 The NTP reported that bisphenol A in food and beverages accounts for the majority of daily human exposure.6  In 2012, the FDA reiterated that “recent studies provide reason for some concern about the potential effects of BPA on the brain, behavior, and prostate gland of fetuses, infants and children.” However, the FDA “recognizes substantial uncertainties with respect to the overall interpretation of these studies and their potential implications for human health effects of BPA exposure. These uncertainties relate to issues such as the routes of exposure employed, the lack of consistency among some of the measured endpoints or results between studies, the relevance of some animal models to human health, differences in the metabolism (and detoxification) of and responses to BPA both at different ages and in different species, and limited or absent dose response information for some studies.”1 Based on this conclusion, the FDA continues to provide for the use of BPA in dental materials, medical devices and food packaging.

According to the CDC, dental caries remains the most common chronic disease of children 6 to 19 years of age—4 times more common than asthma among adolescents aged 14 to 17 years.7 Untreated cavities can cause pain, dysfunction, absence from school, poor appearance and can lead to the spread of infection—problems that greatly affect a child’s quality of life. The utility of composite resin materials for both restoring dental health and preventing caries is well established, while any health risks from their use are not. The ADA fully supports continued research into the safety of BPA; but, based on current evidence, the ADA does not believe there is a basis for health concerns relative to BPA exposure from any dental material.

The ADA is a professional association of dentists committed to the public’s oral health. As such, the ADA supports ongoing research on the safety of existing dental materials and in the development of new materials. Based on current research, the Association agrees with the authoritative government agencies that the low-level of BPA exposure that may result from dental sealants and composites poses no known health threat.

Footnotes
1. Bisphenol A (BPA). U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/PublicHealthFocus/ucm064437.htm accessed January 11, 2013.
2. Indirect Food Additives: Polymers. A Rule by the Food and Drug Administration on 07/17/2012.https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2012/07/17/2012-17366/indirect-food-additives-polymers accessed January 11, 2013.
3. Joskow R, Boyd Barr D, Barr JR, Calafat AM, Needham LL, Rubin C. Exposure to bisphenol A from bis-glycidyl dimethacrylate-based dental sealants. J Am Dent Assoc. 2006;137:353-62.
4. Fleisch, A.F., Sheffield, P.E., Chinn, C., Edelstein, B.L., and Landrigan, P.J. (2010). Bisphenol A and related compounds in dental materials. Pediatrics. 2010;126(4):760-768.
5. Kingman A, Hyman J, Masten SA, Jayaram B, Smith C, Eichmiller F, Arnold MC, Wong PA, Schaeffer JM, Solanki S, Dunn WJ. Bisphenol A and other compounds in human saliva and urine associated the placement of composite restorations. J Am Dent Assoc . 2012;143(12):1292-1302.
6. National Toxicology Program. Center for the Evaluation of Risks to Human Reproduction. Monograph on the Potential Human Reproductive and Developmental Effects of Bisphenol A. NIH Publication No. 08-5994, September 2008.
7. Department of Health and Human Services. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Preventing Dental Caries with Community Programs. 2010 http://www.cdc.gov/oralhealth/publications/factsheets/dental_caries.htm  accessed January 11, 2013.

To root canal or not to root canal

March 21st, 2014

A few of our patients have asked about a controversial article surrounding root canals.  An article was published stating that teeth with root canals are linked to terminal cancer.  There is no valid research linking root canal teeth to disease elsewhere in the body.

Root canal therapy is a treatment that can be performed to save a tooth.  When a tooth has a severe infection, a root canal is often a treatment option that will save the tooth and patients will be able to perform normal function with the root canal tooth within a few weeks.  As dental professionals, we want to save all teeth for patients to continue a healthy lifestyle.

Myths About Root Canals and Root Canal Pain

There are many misconceptions surrounding root canal (endodontic) treatment and whether patients experience root canal pain. The American Association of Endodontists wants you to have accurate information. As always, when considering any medical procedure, you should get as much information as you can about all of your options. Your dentist or endodontist can answer many of your questions, and if you still have concerns, it is often wise to seek a second opinion.


Myth #1—Root canal treatment is painful.

Truth—Root canal treatment doesn’t cause pain, it relieves it.

The perception of root canals being painful began decades ago but with modern technologies and anesthetics, root canal treatment today is no more uncomfortable than having a filling placed. In fact, a recent survey showed that patients who have experienced root canal treatment are six times more likely to describe it as “painless” than patients who have not had root canal treatment.

Most patients see their dentist or endodontist when they have a severe toothache. The toothache can be caused by damaged tissues in the tooth. Root canal treatment removes this damaged tissue from the tooth, thereby relieving the pain you feel.

Back to top


Myth #2—Root canal treatment causes illness.

The myth: Patients searching the Internet for information on root canals may find sites claiming that teeth receiving root canal (endodontic) treatment contribute to the occurrence of illness and disease in the body. This claim is based on long-debunked and poorly designed research performed nearly a century ago by Dr. Weston A. Price.

The truth: There is no valid, scientific evidence linking root canal-treated teeth and disease elsewhere in the body. Decades of research since the 1930s have contradicted Dr. Price’s findings and more recent research continues to support the safety of dental treatment as it relates to overall health.

  • The presence of bacteria in teeth and the mouth has been an accepted fact for many years. But the presence of bacteria does not constitute “infection” and is not necessarily a threat to a person’s health. Bacteria are present in the mouth and teeth at all times, even in teeth that have never had a cavity or other trauma. Research shows that the healthy immune system takes care of bacteria in a matter of minutes.
  • When a severe infection in a tooth requires endodontic treatment, that treatment is designed to eliminate bacteria from the infected root canal and prevent re-infection of the tooth.
  • Tooth extraction is a potentially traumatic procedure and is known to cause a significantly higher incidence of bacteria entering the bloodstream; endodontic treatment confined to the root canal system produces much less trauma and a much lower incidence and magnitude of bacteria entering the blood stream.
  • There is no adequate replacement for the natural tooth – it should be saved whenever possible. Root canal treatment, along with appropriate restoration, is a cost effective way to treat infected teeth because it is usually less expensive than extraction and placement of an implant. In most cases, endodontic treatment allows patients to keep their natural teeth for a lifetime.

References

Back to top


Myth #3—A good alternative to root canal treatment is extraction (pulling the tooth).

Truth—Saving your natural teeth, if possible, is the very best option.

Nothing can completely replace your natural tooth. An artificial tooth can sometimes cause you to avoid certain foods. Keeping your own teeth is important so that you can continue to enjoy the wide variety of foods necessary to maintain the proper nutrient balance in your diet. If your dentist recommends extraction, ask whether root canal treatment is an option.

Endodontic treatment, along with appropriate restoration, is a cost-effective way to treat teeth with damaged pulp and is usually less expensive than extraction and placement of a bridge or an implant.

Endodontic treatment also has a very high success rate. Many root canal-treated teeth last a lifetime.

Placement of a bridge or an implant will require significantly more time in treatment and may result in further procedures to adjacent teeth and supporting tissues.

Millions of healthy endodontically treated teeth serve patients all over the world, years and years after treatment. Those healthy teeth are helping patients chew efficiently, maintain the natural appearance of their smiles and enhance their enjoyment of life. Through endodontic treatment, endodontists and dentists worldwide enable patients to keep their natural teeth for a lifetime.

- See more at: http://www.aae.org/patients/treatments-and-procedures/root-canals/myths-about-root-canals-and-root-canal-pain.aspx#2

 

Smiles For Life Promotion 2014

March 14th, 2014

Smiles For Life: Whiten Your Smile and Help a Child

At Boger Dental we have started our whitening campaign, which runs from March 1 thru June 30.  We are proud to sponsor Smiles for Life again this year.  100% of our proceeds go directly to Smiles for Life and the Ronald McDonald Charities.  We have 2 methods of whitening your teeth, you can set up an hour in-office Boost! whitening appointment or a 20 minute appointment to have impressions for take-home trays.  We have discounted our fees to $540 (Boost!) and $200 (Opalescence trays).  Please call our office at #763-546-7707 or email us at info@bogerdental.com

What’s great about this project is as you receive a fabulous teeth whitening treatment, at a lower cost your payment goes straight to Smiles for Life. Smiles for Life then distributes half of the proceeds to local children’s charities in your area. Children in your own town benefit when you whiten teeth with professional teeth whitening treatments! The other half of the proceeds is given to national and international children’s organizations.

  • The participating Crown Council dentists donate their time.
  • Ultradent, makers of Boost and Opalescence®, donates the teeth whitening materials.
  • 100% of all proceeds go to a charity to benefit children all over the world.

YOU get a fabulous smile! KIDS get a reason to smile, too!

Great Candy Trade-In was a Success!

November 8th, 2013

We had a very successful candy trade in at Boger Dental.  We collected 110 pounds of Halloween candy from our “trick or treaters”!  Thank you to our Boger Dental Team for helping with those brave children ready to hand over their candy for cash!  Dr. Chad Boger and Dr. Joe Madden donated $220 to those children, along with a goodie bag including  toothbrush, toothpaste, floss, and lip balm.  We would like to personally thank Lori Lorence, Lorelle Eng, and Enisa Gluhic for coming in on Saturday to help out with this event.

My daughter and I then drove down to Ronald McDonald Charities on the University of Minnesota campus to deliver our two very heavy boxes full of candy to Lauren Rasmussen, director of their mobile care unit.  Lauren told me that all the candy will be used for the concessions at their movie theatre on campus.  The children who are staying with Ronald McDonald Charities, Upper Midwest are able to “go to the movies” and pick out 2-3 pieces of candy to enjoy while they are watching their movie.  Boger Dental also donated child sized toothbrushes, flossers, and toothpastes.  We couldn’t just leave candy without these essential oral hygiene aids to get that sugar out of their teeth!

Boger Dental also held a drawing for one child to win a child’s Sonicare toothbrush.  The lucky winner is Blake Forrest!  This was a great event to sponsor for our patients and the community of Plymouth.  The team at Boger Dental would like to thank all of the parents who brought their children in for the exchange.  We know it could not have been easy talking them into forfeiting their Halloween “loot”!

 

Oral Cancer Awareness Walk

October 27th, 2013

A big thank you to our Boger Dental team that supported the 3rd Annual Walk/Run for the Twin Cities.  The event is sponsored by The Oral Cancer Foundation.  Dr. Chad Boger, Dr. Joe Madden, Michelle Sensat and Natalie Christiensen graciously took time out of their weekend to support this wonderful cause.  At Boger Dental, we are at the forefront of detecting oral cancer.  We have the distinct advantage of seeing much more than a physician would be able to detect.  Generally, we are seeing patients 2-4 times per year versus an annual physical visit to your physician.  At each dental hygiene visit, both your Dentist and Dental Hygienist are completing a thorough oral cancer screening.  If we do see a lesion that looks suspicious, we are working very closely with the referring oral surgeons to make sure that you are receiving the best care possible.

Oral cancer is on the rise , approximately 42,000 people in the US will be newly diagnosed with oral cancer in 2013.  This is the fifth year in a row in which there has been an increase in the rate of occurrence of oral cancers, in 2007 there was a major jump of over 11% in that single year.  The Oral Cancer Foundation has a very informative website that we would encourage you to look at www.oralcancer.org  If you should ever have any questions, please do not hesitate to talk with your Dentist and Dental Hygienist.

Children’s Brushing Reward Program

October 24th, 2013

We are proud to announce the reintroduction of our Children’s Brushing Reward Program at Boger Dental!  Your children will be rewarded with a chance to win a prize each month by simply getting a report from the Dentist that they are cavity free.  During each dental visit with their dental hygienist your child not only leaves with a clean teeth, but a chance to win an assortment of prizes, such as movie tickets, Skyzone passes, Pump It Up passes, or a new Sonicare toothbrush.  If your child receives a good oral hygiene report from their Dental Hygienist and the Dentist does not find any cavities, they can enter their name into our monthly drawing!  Children aged 3-12 years old are eligible for our program.  If your child wins, we will notify the parents via phone or email of the fantastic news! We would love to share the winner’s photo on our”Kid’s Korner”display, so we would need to get permission from the parents to showcase their child’s hard work.  We welcome you to take a look at this display when you are in for you next visit to Boger Dental.   Your children’s oral health is our number one priority when they are at our dental office and we strongly believe each child deserves to be recognized for their above and beyond work at keeping their teeth and gums healthy and cavity free !  If you have any questions regarding our new program, please email erin@bogerdental.com

Boger Dental Giving Back

September 27th, 2013

We had the opportunity to have two of our charitable organizations come to our office last week to give them our donations for 2013.  On the left is our dental team with Smile Network International, who are our international partner.  On the right are our Doctors with Ronald McDonald House Charities, who are our local partner.  As a team, we donated over $20,000 to these two wonderful partners.  Our dental team worked very hard to gain these donations from our patients and for that we say thank you!  Not only do our patients benefit with a brighter smile, they help underserved children benefit from a healthier smile.  100% of our patient donations go directly to the children who need dental care.  Smile Network International organizes dental groups that travel around the world to correct children with cleft lip/palate deformities.  Ronald McDonald Care Mobile travels locally to underserved children who would otherwise not receive any dental care.  Boger Dental is honored to be a part of both these organizations and look forward to future opportunities that our dental team may be a involved in.  Please take a look at what these organizations are doing to better the dental health of our underserved populations.  www.rmhc-um.org and www.smilenetwork.org

Laser Assisted Periodontal Therapy

September 7th, 2013

Boger Dental has always been a dental practice that exceeds patient expectations.  Part of exceeding those expectations is continuing our dental education routinely.  Our dental hygiene team became certified in Laser Assisted Periodontal Therapy back in 2005.  We went through a rigorous didactic and clinical course in order to begin using this advanced technology to treat gingivitis and periodontal disease.

We know that bacteria is what we battle when treating gum disease.  We know that these bacteria reside within “pockets”, in addition within the actual tissue of the pocket.  Cleaning only the tooth and root surface leaves behind opportunistic bacteria which are free to recolonize and create new disease.  The diode laser is attracted to the components that make inflamed, diseased tissues.  Diode laser energy is thermal and vaporizes the targeted diseased tissue.

The dental hygienists at Boger Dental have witnessed outstanding results when using the laser on their patients’ tissues.  The clinical sign that shows the laser is helping to stabilize their periodontal condition is bleeding.  “I have patients who have the laser as part of their dental cleaning and I have patients who do not.  My patients who use the laser have little to no bleeding, while my patients that do not use the laser have moderate to heavy bleeding.” , said Erin Mastro, RDH BS

Introducing the laser into a patients’ dental cleaning is relatively easy to do.  The laser is not painful and the hygienist typically does not need to use any anesthetic, plus it only takes 5 minutes to complete.  Most patients will not feel a difference immediately after the first use, but the results at their next cleaning will show less bleeding and possibly “pocket” reduction.

At this time dental insurance is not recognizing this procedure as a covered benefit.  We are still submitting this procedure to patient insurance companies, but in the end it is the patient responsibility to pay for this service which is $35.  This is an out of pocket service that will greatly benefit your oral health and overall health.  “There are a lot of studies that suggest that oral health, and gum disease in particular, are related to serious conditions like heart disease,” says periodontist Sally Cram, DDS, a spokeswoman for the American Dental Association.

If you have questions about incorporating laser therapy into your routine hygiene visits, please ask one of our talented dental hygienists at your next visit.  We can demonstrate the laser for you and answer any questions you may have.  Otherwise, please email us at info@bogerdental.com

Bulimia Nervosa Facts

September 4th, 2013

The statistics on bulimia are startling.  About one and a half million people in the United States suffer from bulimia.  About 13% of all high school girls and 4% of all college-aged women suffer from bulimia.

Bulimia nervosa is characterized by recurrent and frequent episodes of eating unusually large amounts of food, and feeling a lack of control over the eating.  This is followed by behaviors that compensate for the eating binge, such as purging, fasting, laxative abuse, excessive exercise, and/or other behaviors.

People are often secretive with behaviors associated with bulimia nervosa, because it is usually accompanied by feelings of disgust or shame.

The dental changes seen in many people with bulimia are often recognizable.  Frequent vomiting may cause your salivary glands to swell and the tissues of your mouth and tongue to become dry, red and sore.  People with bulimia may have chronic sore throat and small hemorrhages under the skin of the palate.

Frequent vomiting can erode your tooth enamel, especially on the tongue side of the upper front teeth.  This sharply increases the risk for decay in these areas and can make these teeth sensitive to temperature.  Severe erosion can lead to changes in your bite, or the way your upper and lower teeth come together.  Your back teeth can be reduced in size and some teeth can even be lost eventually.  Tooth erosion can take about three years to become obvious, but not all bulimics experience it.

Many people with bulimia may be malnourished, which can cause anemia, poor healing and increase the risk of periodontal disease.

During the treatment of your eating disorder, it may take a while to control the episodes of induced vomiting.  To minimize damage done by stomach acid during episodes of vomiting, rinse your mouth with baking soda mixed in water.  You also should rinse with a mouthwash containing .05 percent fluoride, which your dentist can prescribe.  Don’t brush your teeth immediately after vomiting because stomach acid weakens tooth enamel and brushing can cause erosion of the enamel.  When you do brush, use a toothpaste that contains fluoride.  Fluoride helps strengthen teeth.

To help  dry mouth, drink water to keep your mouth moist.  There are also saliva replacements your dentist can prescribe. Your dentist can prescribe daily fluoride treatments with prescription-strength rinses or gels.

If you are bulimic, your dentist may give you fluoride treatments during your dental visits and may prescribe a fluoride gel for home use.  Visit your dentist regularly; he or she can detect decay or infections.

Dental treatment can be an important part of treatment for your bulimia.  Your dentist will work with your health care team and together you can coordinate dental treatment with treatment for the eating disorder. If you have severe tooth damage and are still undergoing treatment for bulimia, your dentist may be able to give you an appliance that covers your teeth and protects them from stomach acids.

Bulimia Nervosa is a treatable disorder that includes medical, dental, and psychological treatment.  Nutritional counseling and education is also important.  Treatment is ongoing and typically lasts three to six months. Statistics show that 80% of bulimics who receive treatment will achieve remission within 3 months, however relapse is common.  As many as 25% are symptomatic within one year of treatment.  If you or someone you know suffer from this disorder please discuss this with a member of your dental team or you can visit www.emilyprogram.com